ageing

Validity of accelerometry in step detection and gait speed measurement in orthogeriatric patients

Type: 
Journal
Year: 
2019
Authors: 
Alexander M. Keppler, Timur Nuritidinow, Arne Mueller, Holger Hoefling, Matthias Schieker, Ieuan Clay, Wolfgang Böcker, Julian Fürmetz
Background:
Mobile accelerometry is a powerful and promising option to capture
long-term changes in gait in both clinical and real-world scenarios.
Increasingly, gait parameters have demonstrated their value as clinical
outcome parameters, but validation of these parameters in elderly
patients is still limited.

Objective:
The aim of this study was to implement a validation framework
appropriate for elderly patients and representative of real-world
settings, and to use this framework to test and improve algorithms for

" POSTOPERATIVE MOBILITY OF TRAUMATIZED GERIATRIC PATIENTS: A PILOT STUDY USING ACTIBELT TECHNOLOGY", Orthopaedic Proceedings, Volume 100-B, Issue SUPP_14 / November 2018

Type: 
Journal
Year: 
2018
Authors: 
Nuritdinow T, Holzschuh J, Keppler A, Lederer C, Boecker W, Kammerlander C, Daumer M, Fuermetz J

Capturing objective data of the postoperative changes in the mobility of
patients is expected to generate a better understanding of the effect
of postoperative treatment. Until recently, the collection of
gait-related data was limited to controlled clinical environments. The
emergence of accurate wearable accelerometers with sufficient runtime,
however, enables the long-term measurement and extraction of mobility
parameters, such as “real-world walking speed”. An interim analysis of
1967 hours of actibelt data (3D accelerometer, 100 Hz) from 5 patients

“Feeling older, walking slower - but only if someone's watching. Subjective age is associated with walking speed in the laboratory, but not in real life”, European Journal of Ageing, December 2018, Volume 15, Issue 4, pp 425–433

Type: 
Journal
Year: 
2017
Authors: 
Notthoff N, Drewelies J, Kazanecka P, Steinhagen-Thiessen E, Norman K, Düzel S, Daumer M, Lindenberger U, Demuth I

The huge inter-individual differences in how people age have prompted
researchers to examine whether people’s own perception of how old they
are—their subjective age—could be a better predictor of relevant
outcomes than their actual chronological age. Indeed, how old people
feel does predict mortality hazards, and health-related measures such as
walking speed may account for this association. In the present study,
we extended this line of work by investigating whether subjective age
also predicts walking speed and running speed in daily life or whether

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